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Cape May Rare Bird Alert - 11/26/2007
CAPE MAY BIRDING HOTLINE November 26, 2007

You have reached the Cape May Birding Hotline, a service of New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory. This week's message was prepared on Monday November 26, 2007. Highlights this week include sightings of WESTERN KINGBIRD, CAVE SWALLOW, LESSER NIGHTHAWK, BARNACLE GOOSE, ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER, LONG-EARED OWL, SHORT-EARED OWL, SAW-WHET OWL, PINE SISKIN, EVENING GROSBEAK, PURPLE FINCH, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, COMMON EIDER, SANDHILL CRANE, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL, COMMON REDPOLL and RED CROSSBILL.

For more up to the minute Cape May sightings information check the "View from the Cape" section of http://www.BirdCapeMay.org

We apologize for the unavoidable lapse of hotline coverage in the previous weeks and we hope that this has not caused anyone any inconvenience.

A LESSER NIGHTHAWK (first NJ state record if accepted) was found yesterday, 11/25, roosting on a branch near the hawk watch platform at the Cape May Point State Park. There have been no further sightings of this bird as of the time of the compilation of this hotline.

A WESTERN KINGBIRD was reported from the end of Wilson St. in West Cape May, yesterday, 11/25. This is the same area that the ASH- THROATED FLYCATCHER has been seen. The ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER was also reported to have been seen, yesterday, 11/25. Wilson Street can be accessed on the left side of Seashore Ave. (heading south) from the West Cape May canal bridge. Park at the end of the street and walk over the railroad tracks. This area is TNC's Cape Island Preserve. The Ash-throated had been seen frequently along the tracks south of Wilson St., but the bird has been observed to the north of Wilson St. as well.

There still are plenty of CAVE SWALLOWS around to be seen. The best chance for spying this species is to plant yourself on the hawkwatch platform at the Cape May Point State Park and wait for one to fly by. Roosting groups as big as 90+ individuals have been seen in Cape May City.

The lone BARNACLE GOOSE continues to be found in the Cape May area the week. The last sighting of this species was this morning, 11/26 at TNC's Cape May Migratory Bird Refuge- CMMBR (a.k.a. the Meadows.) It seems the best chance for spotting this species is first thing in the morning or in the evening at roost at either the CMMBR or on Lake Lilly.

On Saturday, 11/24, numerous reports of LONG-EARED OWLS came in from various locations in Cape May. There was one obliging owl which many observers were fortunate enough to see, most other reports were of accidental flushes that occurred while birding. The same night banding efforts produced no less than 8 SAW-WHET OWLS.

Reports continue to trickle in of PINE SISKIN and other winter finches in the Cape May vicinity, mostly as fly over's. PURPLE FINCH is virtually a daily occurrence here in Cape May and can often be seen at the feeder at CMBO's Northwood Center in Cape May Point. A COMMON REDPOLL was observed flying over the hawkwatch platform on 11/24 and 11/25. A WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL flew past the hawkwacth platform on 11/23. On 11/16, nine RED CROSSBILLS flew past the Avalon seawatch.

EVENING GROSBEAK is being reported as flyovers in spits and spats. One was observed at TNC's CMMBR this morning, 11/26. Also, one was reported as a fly over at the Cape Island Preserve off Wilson St. in West Cape May, yesterday 11/25.

A BALTIMORE ORIOLE was seen at the Beanery on 11/24.

Four COMMON EIDER were seen off Cape May Point on 11/20.

Two SANDHILL CRANES have been frequenting the Cape May Point area in the last week. These birds have been frequently seen in either Bunker pond in front of the hawkwatch platform or on Lighthouse pond at the Cape May Point State Park.

Last reported on 11/24, there had been a very cooperative ORANGE- CROWNED WARBLER at the back part of the loop trail at Hidden Valley (the west side) While one bird had been reported previously there were two individuals at Hidden Valley on 11/24. Additionally ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER has been seen at Higbee Beach near the port-o-john, in the last week.

Up to four imm. RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS have been spotted caching acorns at the Villa WMA. The last report of these birds at this location was on 11/18.

Moving up the Bay Shore, SHORT-EARED OWLS are being seen in the evenings at the end of Jake's Landing Road.

Lastly, a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK visited a private feeder in Leesburg, Cumberland County 0n 11/16 and 17.

ANNOUNCEMENT:

CMBO is offering a special to new and upgraded membership renewals. Join CMBO for the first time or upgrade from Individual or Family to The Hundred and receive Charley Harper's Migration Mainline- Cape May lithograph poster, valued at $50. Call either CMBO center to ask an associate about joining today!

CMBO Bookstore hours are as follows; Northwood Center on East Lake Drive in Cape May Point, starting December 1, will be closed on Tuesdays. The center will be open Wednesday-Monday for the winter. Hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Center for Research and Education on Rt. 47 in Goshen is open Tuesday- Sunday 9:30- 4:30.

The Cape May Birding Hotline is a service of the New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory and details sightings from Cape May, Cumberland, and Atlantic Counties. Updates are made weekly. Please report sightings of rare or unusual birds to CMBO at 609-884-2736. Sponsorship for this hotline comes from the support of CMBO members and business members, and should you not be a member, we cordially invite you to join. Individual membership is $39 per year; $49 for families. You can call either center to become a member or visit. Become a member in person and you'll receive a FREE gift (in addition to member discount in the stores).

Good Luck and Good Birding!

Jason Guerard
Sales Manager
New Jersey Audubon Society
Cape May Bird Observatory
Northwood Center
701 E. Lake Drive, P.O. Box 3
Cape May Point, NJ USA 08212-003
Ph: 609-884-2736 Fx: 609-884-6052
http://www.BirdCapeMay.org
http://www.njaudubon.org

 
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