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Cape May Rare Bird Alert - 5/5/2005
This is the Cape May Birding Hotline, a service of New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory. This message was prepared on Thursday, May 5th. More than the usual level of detail is included this week for the benefit of teams preparing for the World Series of Birding, May 14th. Highlights from the last week include PARASITIC JAEGER, SHEARWATER SP., MARBLED GODWIT, RED KNOT, UPLAND SANDPIPER, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, and lots of migration news.

Birders scanning the sea from Cape May Point on May 1 found 2 PARASITIC JAEGERS, a SHEARWATER sp., 8 BONAPARTES GULLS, and one each COMMON TERN and LEAST TERN. All of the expected swallows were also seen near the coast that day. On May 2nd one PARASITIC JAEGER, 3 LEAST TERNS, 3 WHIMBREL, and a CATTLE EGRET were seen at the South Cape May Meadows. A RING-NECKED DUCK and two BLUE-WINGED TEAL were here on the 1st.

A MARBLED GODWIT was seen on April 28th and again on May 3rd from the Skimmer boat at Two Mile Island.

Birds found at the Coast Guard Ponds along Ocean Dr. on May 3rd include 2 BELTED KINGFISHERS, 2 LESSER SCAUP, 5 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS, 8 GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 3 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, and 3 LESSER YELLOWLEGS.

Highlights from a trip to Nummy Island on May 4th include 10 or more RED KNOTS, many DUNLIN, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS, and WHIMBRELS, several LITTLE BLUE HERONS, TRICOLORED HERONS, and 3 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS, and one each BLACK SKIMMER, MERLIN, and PEREGRINE FALCON.

Sunset Lake harbored two BUFFLEHEAD and at least 10 COMMON LOONS on May 3rd.

Thirteen PURPLE SANDPIPERS were at the Brainard Ave. jetty in Cape May Point on May 5th. Five PURPLE SANDPIPERS were at the St. Peters jetty in Cape May Point on May 2nd and a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was by St. Marys on the same day.

An UPLAND SANDPIPER and a SOLITARY SANDPIPER were in a field at the corner of Fourth and Bayshore in West Cape May on May 1st. Five SOLITARY SANDPIPERS were at Cape May Point State Park on the 1st and three were at the Rea Farm on the 2nd.

BLACK SKIMMERS were at Bivalve, Cumberland County, on May 1st. A NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was at Dividing Creek along Rt. 555 on May 1st, and many other migrant and returning songbirds were found at other Cumberland County sites on May 1st and again on the 4th.

Two GULL-BILLED TERNS and the nesting BALD EAGLES were seen at Beaver Swamp on April 29th, where 2 WILD TURKEYS and a BANK SWALLOW were seen on May 1.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was seen May 3rd and again on the 5th at the Two Mile Beach Unit of the Cape May National Wildlife Refuge. A ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK was also present on the 3rd.

A RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH was at the CMBO Northwood Center May 5th.

Three CATTLE EGRETS were in the lawn of the Eastern Shore Nursing Home along Rt. 9 just north of Cape May Court House on May 4th. A single CATTLE EGRET was next to the parking lot at Cape May Point State Park on May 1st.

A long list of birds was noted at Belleplain State Forest this week, including VEERY, WOOD THRUSH, SCARLET TANAGER, SUMMER TANAGER, PINE SISKIN, ACADIAN FLYCATCHER, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, WORM-EATING WARBLER, NASHVILLE WARBLER, BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER, BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, HOODED WARBLER, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, and many others.

Three SUMMER TANAGERS, a YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, and many OVENBIRDS were along Tick Neck Rd. on May 4th.

SUMMER TANAGERS were also at the Stocker Tract of the Cape May National Wildlife Refuge on May 4th, along with ORCHARD ORIOLE, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, WORM-EATING WARBLER, BLUE GROSBEAK, and several GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHERS.

The wet woods off Fulling Mill Rd. harbored KENTUCKY WARBLER, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, HOODED WARBLER, LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, and RED-EYED VIREO on May 3rd.

BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, PALM WARBLER, YELLOW WARBLER, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, PRAIRIE WARBLER, and abundant YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS were at the CMBO Northwood Center on May 4th. A female PURPLE FINCH visited the feeders here on April 29th.

BOBOLINKS are being seen at Hidden Valley, Higbee, and along the West Cape May railroad track fields.

AMERICAN WOODCOCKS are still displaying at the South Cape May Meadows and at Higbee.

The Cape May Bird Observatory offers an extensive series of regular bird walks that require no pre-registration and many special field trips and programs for which advanced registration is required. To receive a copy of our Program Schedule, stop at one of our centers, call the office during business hours at 609-861-0700, call our natural history and events hotline at 609-861-0466, or go to New Jersey Audubon's web site at http://www.njaudubon.org

This Cape May Birding Hotline is a service of the Cape May Bird Observatory, which is a research, conservation, and education unit of the New Jersey Audubon Society. Our aim is to preserve and perpetuate the ornithological significance of Cape May. Your membership supports these goals and this hotline. We detail sightings from around Cape May County, and also include reports from Cumberland and Atlantic Counties. Updates are typically made on Thursdays. Please report your sightings of rare or unusual birds to CMBOs Northwood Center at 609-884-2736, or e-mail reports to CapeMayReports@njaudubon.org. Thanks for calling and GOOD BIRDING!

 
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