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Cape May Rare Bird Alert - 9/25/2003
You have reached the Cape May Birding Hotline, a service of New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory. This message was prepared on Thursday, September 25, 2003. Highlights from the last week include PURPLE GALLINULE, SOOTY TERN, BRIDLED TERN, MANX SHEARWATER, AUDUBON'S SHEARWATER, BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL, BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, ARCTIC TERN, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW, LINCOLN'S SPARROW, LARK SPARROW, COMMON EIDER, LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, SANDWICH TERN, MARBLED GODWIT, OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, CONNECTICUT WARBLER, PHILADELPHIA VIREO, and DICKCISSEL.

An immature PURPLE GALLINULE was seen at The Nature Conservancy's Cape May Migratory Bird Refuge ("The Meadows") on Sept. 20th. A cooperative SORA has been here all week.

Hurricane Isabel left many interesting birds in its wake that were found off Cape May on Sept. 19th, including 2 SOOTY TERNS, 5 BRIDLED TERNS, 2 MANX SHEARWATERS, 1 AUDUBON'S SHEARWATER, 1 BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL, 1 BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, 1 ARCTIC TERN, and 25 JAEGERS. Most were seen from Sunset Beach. Here's the complete list of noteworthy post-hurricane sightings from the 19th:

Manx Shearwater - 2
Audubon's Shearwater - 1
Manx/Audubon's Shearwater - 1
Wilson's Storm-Petrel - 1
Band-rumped Storm-Petrel - 1
Band-rumped/Leach's Storm-Petrel - 3
Northern Gannet - 3
Red-necked Phalarope - 2
Pomarine Jaeger - 15
Parasitic Jaeger - 9
small jaeger sp. - 1
Black-legged Kittiwake - 1 ad.
Sandwich Tern - 34
Roseate Tern - 16
Arctic Tern - 1 juv.
Black Tern - 6
Bridled Tern - 5
Sooty Tern - 2 ad.

1 POMARINE JAEGER and 2 PARASITIC JAEGERS were seen at Sunset Beach on the 20th, and a POMARINE JAEGER was seen from the Hawkwatch in Cape May Point State Park on the 23rd.

A CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was seen at the Higbee Beach Wildlife Management Area in the Tower Field on Sept. 24th and 25th. Other CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS were in an Avalon yard on the 21st and at the Higbee Dike on the 20th and again on the 24th. 2 LINCOLN'S SPARROWS were at Higbee on the 24th. A LARK SPARROW was near one of the dune crossover paths in Cape May Point State Park on Sept. 21st.

A COMMON EIDER was in Delaware Bay off Higbee Beach Sept. 20th through at least the 23rd.

Two adult LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS, 6 SANDWICH TERNS, and 6 MARBLED GODWITS were at Stone Harbor Point on Sept. 23rd.

Highlights from the songbird migration at Higbee this week include OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER and YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER on Sept. 24th, CONNECTICUT WARLBERS on Sept. 20th and 24th, PHILADELPHIA VIREOS daily, and 2 DICKCISSELS, 22 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS, 177 NORTHERN PARULAS, 55 RED-EYED VIREOS, and 18 SCARLET TANAGERS on the 21st.

Note that the "free bridge" connecting Nummy's Island to south Stone Harbor is now closed until further notice for construction.

The Cape May Bird Observatory offers an extensive series of regular bird walks that require no pre-registration and many special field trips and programs for which advanced registration is required. To receive a copy of our Program Schedule, stop at one of our centers, call the office during business hours at 609-861-0700, call our natural history and events hotline at 609-861-0466, or go to New Jersey Audubon's WEB SITE at http://www.njaudubon.org

This Cape May Birding Hotline is a service of the Cape May Bird Observatory, which is a research, conservation, and education unit of the New Jersey Audubon Society. Our aim is to preserve and perpetuate the ornithological significance of Cape May. Your membership supports these goals and this hotline. We detail sightings from around Cape May County, and also include reports from Cumberland and Atlantic Counties. Updates are typically made on Thursdays. Please report your sightings of rare or unusual birds to CMBO's Northwood Center at 609-884-2736, or e-mail reports to CapeMayReports@njaudubon.org. Thanks for calling and GOOD BIRDING!

Mark S. Garland, Senior Naturalist
Cape May Bird Observatory Northwood Center
701 E. Lake Dr., PO Box 3
Cape May Point, NJ 08212
mark@njaudubon.org

 
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